Diminished

Incompetence is one of the core values that a certain member of the faculty strives to maintain. Let me give an example of this core value in action. I stressed and put all my time into studying for a mental health assessment. I sacrificed time with my child to study and pour over my notes for hours on end. The scales definitely tipped in favour of horrible mother/good student after the amount of revising that went down. The dedication and hard work is a one way street. Waiting on the return is a bit like sitting on the other side of the road, abandoned, waiting for the bus that never comes. Would you believe it took my tutor six weeks to give me my results? That is three times the official turnaround. Not to mention how it felt being left hanging for that long.

What about another example? This time it was a written report to be no more than 1500 words. Requirements changed on a weekly basis. It was exhausting trying to keep up. Despite a lack of structure I finished and submitted before the deadline. I should probably mention at this point the deadline was changed to suit another student. The requirements for this report were changed after I submitted my report. You read that right, she had mine submitted and ready to be marked and she changed the requirements. Wait, it gets better. It wasn’t until a fellow student said she had no word count left to make amendments that the tutor declared that there wasn’t a word count! Incompetence in action.

But what other core values are there? The second one that the faculty are teeming with is favouritism. There is absolutely no place for favouritism in any educational setting. It’s detrimental to everyone involved. Firstly, it’s detrimental to the favoured student because there can’t ever be a true evaluation of self. Secondly, it’s detrimental to the tutor doing the favouring because it calls into question their ethics and suitability as an educator. Thirdly, it’s detrimental to all the other students whose work is affected by a lack of interest and guidance.

Favouritism knows no departmental bounds. Here’s a scenario: you studied, researched and practiced past papers for an assessment for weeks. How would you feel if the tutor said she marked it but when you ask for it back she decides you had to wait until next week? I’d hazard a guess at not too happy. Now, how would you feel if someone else asked for their paper back and it was handed to them there and then to fix? A whole mix of unpleasant emotions because that action is essentially saying you have less value as a student relative to another. After all, your future isn’t as important is it?

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